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Carcinogenicity of night shift work
In June, 2019, a Working Group of 27 scientists from 16 countries met at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in Lyon, France, to finalise their evaluation of the carcinogenicity of night shift work. This assessment will be published in volume 124 of the IARC Monographs. In 2007, shift work involving circadian disruption was classified as “probably carcinogenic to humans” (Group 2A), on the basis of sufficient evidence in experimental animals and limited evidence of breast cancer in humans. In this updated evaluation, the Working Group chose the name “night shift...
Organisational climate and employee health outcomes: A systematic review
Organisational climate, particularly safety climate, has been documented as a crucial element in promoting occupational health and safety. However, most previous studies have focused more on safety issues (e.g., injuries and accidents) rather than health outcomes (e.g., illnesses, stress, etc). A comprehensive review is also lacking in relation to understanding the organisational climate–health relationship between different levels of analysis, different data sources and different analytical procedures. We conducted a systematic review to investigate previous scholarly contributions to organisational...
The impact of night shift work on breast cancer
Results from the Burden of Occupational Cancer in Canada Study Background: We estimated the proportion and number of female breast cancer cases in Canada attributable to night shift work, a probable cause of breast cancer. Methods: Levin's equation was used to calculate population attributable fractions (PAFs) among Canadian women who ever worked night/rotating shifts from 1961 to 2000, accounting for labor turnover and survival to the year 2011. The calculated PAFs were applied to 2011 Canadian breast cancer incidence statistics to obtain the number of attributable cases. Results: Approximately...
Do Working Hours Affect Health? Evidence from Statutory Workweek Regulations in Germany
This study estimates the causal effect of working hours on health. We deal with the endogeneity of working hours through instrumental variables techniques. In particular, we exploit exogenous variation in working hours from statutory workweek regulations in the German public sector as an instrumental variable. Using panel data, we run two-stage least squares regressions controlling for individual-specific unobserved heterogeneity. We find adverse consequences of increasing working hours on subjective and several objective health measures. The effects are mainly driven by women and parents of minor...
Association of changes in work shifts and shift intensity with change in fatigue and disturbed sleep: a within-subject study
Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine whether changes in work shifts and shift intensity are related to changes in difficulties to fall asleep, fatigue, and sleep length. Methods: Questionnaire responses of hospital employees (N=7727, 93% women) in 2008, 2012, 2014 and 2015 were linked to daily-based records of working hours during three months preceding each survey. We used conditional logistic regression and longitudinal fixed-effects analyses to investigate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each 25% within-individual change in the proportion of working hour characteristics...
949 Shiftwork and breast cancer: epidemiology, burden, and implications for prevention
Introduction: Approximately one in five workers globally work night, evening, or rotating shifts. Shiftwork involving circadian disruption is a probable carcinogen for breast cancer. Our objective was to synthesise the current state of the epidemiological literature, report on shiftwork-associated breast cancer burden in Canada, and discuss implications for prevention. Methods: A search was conducted for meta-analyses accompanied by a systematic review, published from 2010–2017, that included at least one meta-risk estimate (mRE) for breast cancer associated with any permanent/rotating night...
Night-shift work and hematological cancers
A population based case-control study in three Nordic countries Objective: The aim of this case–control study was to assess the effect of night-shift work on the risk of hematological cancers. Methods: The study included 39 371 leukemia, 56 713 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 9322 Hodgkin lymphoma, and 26 188 multiple myeloma cases diagnosed between 1961 and 2005 in Finland, Sweden, and Iceland. Five controls for each case were selected from the Nordic Occupational Cancer Study (NOCCA) cohort, matched by year of birth, sex and country. Night-shift exposure was assessed by using the NOCCA job-exposure...
Night Shift Work Increases the Risks of Multiple Primary Cancers in Women
A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of 61 Articles A growing number of studies have examined associations between night shift work and the risks of common cancers among women, with varying conclusions. We did a meta-analysis to identify whether long-term night shift work increased the risks of common cancers in women. We enrolled 61 articles involving 114,628 cases and 3,909,152 participants from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Risk estimates were performed with a random-effect model or a fixed-effect model. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression analyses about breast cancer were conducted...
Night Shift Work Increases the Risks of Multiple Primary Cancers in Women
A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of 61 Articles A growing number of studies have examined associations between night shift work and the risks of common cancers among women, with varying conclusions. We did a meta-analysis to identify whether long-term night shift work increased the risks of common cancers in women. We enrolled 61 articles involving 114,628 cases and 3,909,152 participants from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Risk estimates were performed with a random-effect model or a fixed-effect model. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression analyses about breast cancer were conducted...
Shift work and the risk of cardiovascular disease
A systematic review and meta-analysis including dose–response Relationship Objectives: The aim of this review was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events associated with shift work and determine if there is a dose–response relationship in this association. Method: Electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science) were searched for cohort or case–control control study designs in any population, reporting exposure to shift work as the main contributing factor to estimate CVD risk. For each study, adjusted relative risk (RR) ratios and 95% confidence intervals...
A review of the impact of shift-work on cancer
Summary of the evidence for practitioners Shift work that involves disruption to the body's circadian rhythm is classified as probably carcinogenic to humans based on limited evidence in humans and sufficient evidence in experimental animals. This article draws together the available information from the epidemiological, mechanistic and health and safety practice research to provide advice for practitioners. There is evidence that the increase in breast cancer risk amongst women who have worked night shifts is relatively modest and we cannot exclude the possibility that there is no cancer risk...
Shiftwork and the Retinal Vasculature Diameters Among Police Officers
Objective: To investigate associations of central retinal arteriolar equivalent (CRAE), a measure of retinal arteriolar width, and central retinal venular equivalents (CRVE), a measure of retinal venular width, with shiftwork in 199 police officers (72.9% men). Methods: Shiftwork (day, afternoon, night) was assessed using electronic payroll records. Four digital retinal images per officer were taken. Mean diameters of the retinal vasculature were compared across shifts using analysis of variance (ANOVA)/analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Results: Among all officers (mean age = 46.6 ± 6.8 years...
Night Shift Work and Its Health Effects on Nurses
The purpose of this research was to study night shift work and its health effects on nurses. This was a quantitative study using descriptive design; it also incorporated three qualitative open-ended questions to complement the study. The data were collected using Survey Monkey, with an Internet-based confidential data collection tool. The population of relevance to this study was nurses employed in hospital settings in the United States. E-mail addresses and Facebook were used to recruit participants. Results indicated that there is an increased risk of sleep deprivation, family stressors, and...
Personal light-at-night exposures and components of variability in two common shift work industries
Uses and implications for future research Objectives: Shift workers’ increased risk of various adverse health outcomes has been linked to light-at-night (LAN) exposure, but few studies have measured LAN exposure in workplaces. To inform future research methods, this study aimed to (i) measure shift workers’ exposures to LAN across industries, occupations, and work environments and (ii) assess components of variance across different exposure groupings and metrics. Methods: Between October 2015 and March 2016, 152 personal full-shift measurements were collected from 102 night shift workers...
Night work, long work weeks, and risk of accidental injuries
A register-based study Danish employees with night work had a higher ratio of accidental injuries compared to day workers. Awareness should be raised in order to prevent injuries in the future. No association between weekly working hours and accidental injuries were found. Thus it appears that the current regulation ensures that long weekly working hours does not imply an increased risk of injuries. Source: Larsen, A. D., Hannerz, H., Møller, S. V., Dyreborg, J., Bonde, J. P., Hansen, J., ... & Garde, A. H. (2017). Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health . http://dx.doi...
Shift work and the incidence of prostate cancer
A 10-year follow-up of a German population-based cohort study Objectives: We investigated the association of shift and night work with the incidence of prostate cancer using data of the population-based prospective Heinz Nixdorf Recall Study from the highly industrialized Ruhr area in Germany. Methods: Participants of the baseline survey were recruited between 2000–2003. A follow-up survey including, a detailed interview on shift and night work, was conducted from 2011–2014. We included 1757 men who did not report a history of prostate cancer at baseline. We assessed shift- and night...
Outdoor Light at Night and Breast Cancer Incidence in the Nurses’ Health Study II
Background: Animal and epidemiologic studies suggest that exposure to light at night (LAN) may disrupt circadian patterns and decrease nocturnal secretion of melatonin, which may disturb estrogen regulation, leading to increased breast cancer risk.Objectives: We examined the association between residential outdoor LAN and breast cancer incidence using data from the nationwide U.S.-based Nurses' Health Study II cohort.Methods:We followed 109,672 women from 1989 through 2013. Cumulative LAN exposure was estimated using time-varying satellite data for a composite of persistent nighttime illumination...
Shift work, long working hours, and later risk of dementia
A long-term follow-up of the Copenhagen Male Study The current study investigates the unresolved question about the effect of shift work and long working hours on dementia. We did not find an increased incidence of dementia among shift workers or employees with long working hours. Such working hours may lead to acute cognitive impairments but there is no strong evidence for a chronic effect eventually leading to dementia. Source: Nabe-Nielsen, K., Garde, A. H., Ishtiak-Ahmed, K., Gyntelberg, F., Westendorp, R. G., & Hansen, Å. M. (2017). Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment &...
Rotating night shift work and risk of breast cancer in the Nurses' Health Studies
In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer declared shift work involving circadian disruption to be a “probable” carcinogen (group 2A), noting that human evidence was limited. This study examined associations between rotating night shift work and breast cancer risk in two prospective cohorts, the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS: 1988–2012, n = 78,516; NHS2: 1989–2013, n = 114,559), with 9,541 incident invasive breast malignancies and 24 years of follow-up. Women in NHS with 30+ years of shift work had no increased risk of breast cancer (Hazard ratio (HR) =...
Night-shift work is associated with increased pain perception
Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine whether shift workers exhibit increased perception of experimentally induced pain after working night shifts. Methods: The study was a paired cross-over design with two sleep conditions, after at least two nights of habitual sleep and after two consecutive night shifts at work. Fifty-three nurses in rotating shift work participated. The sensitivity to electrically induced pain, heat pain, cold pain, pressure pain and pain inhibition was determined experimentally in each sleep condition. Sleepiness and vigilance were also assessed. Results...
The impact of reduced worktime on sleep and perceived stress
A group randomized intervention study using diary data The results of this present study show beneficial effects on sleep and stress due to a worktime reduction of 25% for full-time workers, including increased sleep duration during workdays. The paper may contribute to unresolved questions about the possible positive effects of implementing 6-hour workdays on employee's long-term health and work performance. Source: Schiller H, Lekander M, Rajaleid K, Hellgren C, Åkerstedt T, Barck-Holst P, Kecklund G. (2016). Scand J Work Environ Health . http://dx.doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3610
Short-term effects of night shift work on breast cancer risk
A cohort study of payroll data The epidemiological evidence of an association between night shifts and breast cancer is limited. Studies have relied on self-reported information on working time, which may have inflated findings by recall bias. This study included individual, objective, and detailed information on working time from pay roll registers. There is no increased risk of breast cancer following recent night shift work. Source: Vistisen HT, Garde AH, Frydenberg M, Christiansen P, Hansen ÅM, Hansen J, Bonde JPE, Kolstad HA. (2016). Scand J Work Environ Health . http://dx.doi.org/10...
Chronic Disease Risks From Exposure to Long-Hour Work Schedules Over a 32-Year Period
Objectives: This study aims at evaluating the chronic disease risk related to prolonged work in long-hour schedules for eight major chronic diseases: heart disease, non-skin cancer, arthritis, diabetes, chronic lung disease, asthma, chronic depression, and hypertension. Methods: The study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 covering 32 years of job history (1978 to 2009) for 7492 respondents. Logistic regression analyses were performed to test the relationship between average weekly work hours, and the reported prevalence of those conditions for each individual. Results...
La pénibilité du travail en horaires décalés
Évaluation des troubles du sommeil à l'aide de l'enregistrement polysomnographique chez des salariés en horaires décalés En médecine du travail, les enquêtes rapportent que 20 à 40 % des salariés se plaignent de mauvais sommeil. Malheureusement, les troubles du sommeil et de la vigilance sont trop souvent sous-estimés dans le milieu du travail et souvent restent du domaine de la vie privée. En France, plus de 20 % (soit quatre à cinq millions des travailleurs salariés) sont en rythme posté ou...
Chronic Disease Risks From Exposure to Long-Hour Work Schedules Over a 32-Year Period
Objectives: This study aims at evaluating the chronic disease risk related to prolonged work in long-hour schedules for eight major chronic diseases: heart disease, non-skin cancer, arthritis, diabetes, chronic lung disease, asthma, chronic depression, and hypertension. Methods: The study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 covering 32 years of job history (1978 to 2009) for 7492 respondents. Logistic regression analyses were performed to test the relationship between average weekly work hours, and the reported prevalence of those conditions for each individual. Results...
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