2016-05-01 12:00 - Messages

Effectiveness of Occupation- and Activity-Based Interventions to Improve Everyday Activities and Social Participation for People With Traumatic Brain Injury

A Systematic Review
This systematic review presents research on the effectiveness of occupation- and activity-based interventions to improve everyday activities and areas of occupation and social participation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Nineteen studies identified through a comprehensive database search were reviewed and synthesized into five themes: (1) multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary treatment approaches, (2) community-based rehabilitation programs, (3) treatment approaches using client-centered goals and relevant contexts, (4) social skills training and peer mentoring interventions, and (5) community mobility interventions. Evidence supports the use of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches across a variety of settings, with no single treatment approach or setting clearly superior to another. The specific contributions of occupational therapy practitioners and the nature of occupational therapy interventions have not been well studied, making it difficult to determine the extent to which occupation- and activity-based interventions provided by occupational therapy practitioners improve occupational performance and social participation after TBI.

Source: Janet M. Powell; Timothy J. Rich; Elizabeth K. Wise. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 2016, Vol. 70.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.020909

Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Danish version of the 19-item return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) questionnaire

A Danish version of the 19-item return-to-work self-efficacy (RTWSE-19) questionnaire was developed. The performance of a questionnaire may differ between populations and in various cultures. In order to use the RTWSE-19 in a Danish context, translation was necessary, and cross-cultural and conceptual adaptation needed to preserve the original purpose of the instrument.

Source: Hedeager Momsen A-M, Rosbjerg R, Stapelfeldt CM, Lund T, Jensen C, Johansen T, Nielsen CV, Labriola M. Scand J Work Environ Health, 2016.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5271/sjweh.3568

Manual therapy for tension-type headache related to quality of work life and work presenteeism

Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this research is to evaluate the efficacy of manual therapy for tension-type headache (TTH) in restoring workers quality of work life, and how work presenteeism affects this relation. DESIGN: This study is a secondary analysis of a factorial, randomized clinical trial on manual therapy interventions. Altogether, 80 patients (85% women) with TTH and without current symptoms of any other concomitant disease participated. INTERVENTIONS: An experienced therapist delivered the treatment: myofascial inhibitory technique (IT), articulatory technique (AT), combined technique (IT and AT), and control group (no treatment). RESULTS: In general, all treatments as compared to our control group had a large effect (f>/=.69) in the improvement of participants' quality of work life. Work presenteeism interacted with TTH treatment type's efficacy on participant's quality of work life. The inhibitory technique lead to higher reports of quality of work life than other treatment options only for participants with very low frequency of work presenteeism. In turn, TTH articulatory treatment techniques resulted in higher reports of quality of work life for a high to very high work presenteeism frequency. CONCLUSION: Articulatory manipulation technique is the more efficient treatment to improve quality of work life when the frequency of work presenteeism is high. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Source: Monzani L, Espi-Lopez GV, Zurriaga R, et al. Complementary Therapies in Médicine, 2016; 25: 86-91.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2016.01.008

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