2016-11-01 12:00 - Messages

Development and validation of a prediction model for long-term sickness absence based on occupational health survey variables

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a prediction model for identifying employees at increased risk of long-term sickness absence (LTSA), by using variables commonly measured in occupational health surveys. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Based on the literature, 15 predictor variables were retrieved from the DAnish National working Environment Survey (DANES) and included in a model predicting incident LTSA (>/=4 consecutive weeks) during 1-year follow-up in a sample of 4000 DANES participants. The 15-predictor model was reduced by backward stepwise statistical techniques and then validated in a sample of 2524 DANES participants, not included in the development sample. Identification of employees at increased LTSA risk was investigated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis; the area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) reflected discrimination between employees with and without LTSA during follow-up. RESULTS: The 15-predictor model was reduced to a 9-predictor model including age, gender, education, self-rated health, mental health, prior LTSA, work ability, emotional job demands, and recognition by the management. Discrimination by the 9-predictor model was significant (AUC = 0.68; 95% CI 0.61-0.76), but not practically useful. CONCLUSIONS: A prediction model based on occupational health survey variables identified employees with an increased LTSA risk, but should be further developed into a practically useful tool to predict the risk of LTSA in the general working population.

Source: Roelen, C., Thorsen, S., Heymans, M., Twisk, J., Bültmann, U., & Bjørner, J. (2016). Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-8.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2016.1247471

Costs and Work Loss Burden of Diagnosed Opioid Abuse Among Employees on Workers Compensation or Short-term Disability

Objective: To compare 12-month healthcare costs between employees with versus without diagnosed opioid abuse within 12 months after an injury-related workers' compensation (WC) or short-term disability (STD) claim.
Methods: Retrospective study using 2003 to 2014 US insurance claims linked to administrative data on WC/STD claims. Multivariable models compared healthcare costs between employees with versus without diagnosed opioid abuse.
Results: Study included 107,975 opioid-treated employees with an injury-related WC or STD claim. Mean number of opioid prescription fills and adjusted total healthcare costs were substantially greater in employees with diagnosed opioid abuse versus without (WC: 13.4 vs. 4.5, P?<?0.001; $18,073 vs. $8470, P?<?0.001; STD: 13.7 vs. 4.5, P?<?0.001; $25,693 vs. $14,939, P?<?0.001).
Conclusion: Opioids are commonly prescribed to employees with injury-related WC/STD claims. Employers may benefit from proactively addressing the issue of opioid abuse in these populations.

Source: Johnston, S. S., Alexander, A. H., Masters, E. T., Mardekian, J., Semel, D., Malangone-Monaco, E., ... & Sadosky, A. (2016). Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 58(11), 1087-1097.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000000865

Effects of a randomized controlled intervention trial on return to work and health care utilization after long-term sickness absence

BACKGROUND: The aim of the RCT study was to investigate if the effect of a multidisciplinary intervention on return to work (RTW) and health care utilization differed by participants' self-reported health status at baseline, defined by a) level of somatic symptoms, b) health anxiety and c) self-reported general health. METHODS: A total of 443 individuals were randomized to the intervention (n = 301) or the control group (n = 142) and responded to a questionnaire measuring health status at baseline. Participants were followed in registries measuring RTW and health care utilization. Relative risk (RR) and odds ratio (OR) were used as measures of associations. Results were adjusted for gender, age, educational level, work ability and previous sick leave. RESULTS: Among all responders we found no effect of the intervention on RTW. Among participants with low health anxiety, the one-year probability of RTW was lower in the intervention than in the control group (RR = 0.79 95 % CI 0.68-0.93), but for those with high health anxiety there was no difference between the groups (RR = 1.15 95 % CI 0.84-1.57). Neither general health nor somatic symptoms modified the effect of the intervention on RTW. The intervention had no effect on health care utilization. CONCLUSIONS: The multidisciplinary intervention did not facilitate RTW or decrease health care utilization compared to ordinary case management in subgroups with multiple somatic symptoms, health anxiety or low self-rated health. However, the intervention resulted in a reduced chance of RTW among participants with low health anxiety levels.

Source: Momsen, A. M. H., Stapelfeldt, C. M., Nielsen, C. V., Nielsen, M. B. D., Aust, B., Rugulies, R., & Jensen, C. (2016). BMC Public Health, 16(1), 1149.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-3812-4

Engaging Employers to Prevent Disability

The Journal is honored to be publishing this special issue and grateful to all of the very talented contributors involved. The papers in this issue of the Journal provide not only a state-of-the-art review of employer factors and interventions but also provide information about research design challenges and recommendations that will be useful for anyone planning research in this domain. Practitioners will also appreciate the efforts to include information from the “grey literature” and to highlight issues of employer decision-making and implementation. All of the papers have been published as “Open Access” and can be accessed freely on the SpringerLink website. We trust that you will find this work helpful in your efforts to improve the understanding, prevention, and management of work disability.

Source: (2016). Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 26(4).
http://link.springer.com/journal/10926/26/4

Managerial abuse and the process of absence among mental health staff

Managers' abuse of subordinates is a common form of unethical behaviour in workplaces. When exposed to such abuse, employees may go absent from work. We propose two possible explanations for employee absence in response to managerial abuse: a sociological explanation based on perceptions of organizational justice and a psychological explanation based on psychological strain. Both are tested using data from a sample of 1472 mental health workers. The occurrence, duration and frequency of absence are investigated using a hurdle model. Managerial abuse is found to be associated with the occurrence of absence through both perceptions of organizational justice and psychological strain. Distributive justice and depression are especially significant in explaining the relationship between abuse and absence. Once absent, duration of absence is not further affected by managerial abuse but is still linked to depression and distributive justice, whereas frequency of absence is linked to bullying and depression.

Source: Wood, S., Niven, K., & Braeken, J. (2016). Work, Employment & Society.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0950017015613755

Chronic Condition Combinations and Productivity Loss Among Employed Nonelderly Adults (18 to 64 Years)

Objective: We examined the relationship between specific chronic condition combinations and productivity loss measured by missed work days among nonelderly employed adults with at least two physical chronic conditions of arthritis, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and hypertension.
Methods: We analyzed data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for the years 2004 to 2012.
Results: Adults with arthritis/diabetes/heart disease had the highest average missed work days (14.42). In the adjusted model, compared with adults with arthritis/hypertension, adults with diabetes/heart disease and arthritis/heart disease/hypertension had significantly higher missed work days, while adults with diabetes/hypertension had significantly lower missed work days.
Conclusion: Specific chronic condition combinations have a high burden of disease in terms of productivity loss. Workplace health programs that address multiple health conditions at the same time should be implemented to reduce missed work days.

Source: Meraya, A. M., & Sambamoorthi, U. (2016). Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 58(10), 974-978.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000000839

Abonnement courriel

Messages récents

Catégories

Méthodes et types d’études

Mots-Clés (Tags)

Blogoliste

Archives